4.1 Observing basicsBinary and Millisecond Pulsars3.5 Going further

4 Pulsar Timing 

It became clear soon after their discovery that pulsars are excellent celestial clocks. In the original discovery paper [75], the period of the first pulsar to be discovered, PSR B1919+21, was found to be stable to one part in tex2html_wrap_inline1881 over a time-scale of a few months. Following the discovery of the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 in 1982 [20] it was demonstrated that its period could be measured to one part in tex2html_wrap_inline2151 or better [52]. This unrivaled stability leads to a host of applications including time keeping, probes of relativistic gravity and natural gravitational wave detectors. Subsequently a whole science has developed into measuring the pulse time-of-arrival as accurately as possible.





4.1 Observing basicsBinary and Millisecond Pulsars3.5 Going further

image Binary and Millisecond Pulsars
D. R. Lorimer (dunc@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de)
http://www.livingreviews.org/lrr-1998-10
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