1 Introduction

Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology

Update available: http://www.livingreviews.org/lrr-2001-2

Peter Anninos
Laboratory for Computational Astrophysics
National Center for Supercomputing Applications
Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA

(Accepted 15 January 1998)


In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

1 Introduction

image Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology
Peter Anninos
© Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. ISSN 1433-8351
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