1.1 What's new in this Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at

1 Preamble 

In the 34 years that have elapsed since the discovery [97Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article] of pulsars, rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars, the study of these fascinating objects has resulted in many applications in physics and astronomy. Striking examples include the confirmation of the existence of gravitational radiation [241Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article] as predicted by general relativity [239Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article, 240Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article] and the first detection of an extra-solar planetary system [273Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article, 186Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article].

  

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Figure 1: The numbers and locations of the various types of radio pulsars known as of December 2000. The large and small Magellanic clouds are denoted by LMC and SMC.

The diverse zoo of radio pulsars currently known is summarized graphically by the Venn diagram in Fig.  1 . Many new binary systems containing neutron stars are being discovered as a result of the latest generation of pulsar surveys. This review is concerned primarily with the results and spin-offs from these surveys which are of particular interest to the relativity community.





1.1 What's new in this Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at

image Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at the New Millennium
Duncan R. Lorimer
http://www.livingreviews.org/lrr-2001-5
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