List of Figures

View Image Figure 1:
The final fate of accretion OMgNe white dwarfs as a function of the initial white dwarf mass and the accretion rate onto the white dwarf. (Figure 3 of [187]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 2:
A comparison between the GW amplitude h(f) for various sources and the LIGO-II sensitivity curve. See the text for details regarding the computations of h. The AIC sources are assumed to be located at a distance of 100 Mpc; the SNe sources at 10 Mpc; and the Population III sources at a luminosity distance of ~ 50 Gpc. Secular bar-mode sources are identified with an (s), dynamical bar-modes with a (d).
View Image Figure 3:
Type I waveform (quadrupole amplitude AE220 as a function of time) from one of Zwerger and Müller’s [271] simulations of a collapsing polytrope. The vertical dotted line marks the time at which the first bounce occurred. (Figure 5d of [271]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 4:
Type II waveform (quadrupole amplitude AE220 as a function of time) from one of Zwerger and Müller’s [271] simulations of a collapsing polytrope. The vertical dotted line marks the time at which bounce occurred. (Figure 5a of [271]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 5:
Type III waveform (quadrupole amplitude AE220 as a function of time) from one of Zwerger and Müller’s [271] simulations of a collapsing polytrope. The vertical dotted line marks the time at which bounce occurred. (Figure 5e of [271]; used with permission).
Watch/download Movie Figure 6: (Movie)
Movie showing the evolution of a secular bar instability, see Ou et al. [191] for details.
Watch/download Movie Figure 7: (Movie)
Movie showing the evolution of the regular collapse model A3B2G4 of Dimmelmeier et al. [60]. The left frame contains the 2D evolution of the logarithmic density. The upper and lower right frames display the evolutions of the gravitational wave amplitude and the maximum density, respectively.
Watch/download Movie Figure 8: (Movie)
Movie showing the same as Movie 7, but for rapid collapse model A3B2G5 of Dimmelmeier et al. [60].
Watch/download Movie Figure 9: (Movie)
Movie showing the same as Movie 7, but for multiple collapse model A2B4G1 of Dimmelmeier et al. [60].
Watch/download Movie Figure 10: (Movie)
Movie showing the same as Movie 7, but for rapid, differentially rotating collapse model A4B5G5 of Dimmelmeier et al. [60].
View Image Figure 11:
The gravitational waveform (including separate matter and neutrino contributions) from the collapse simulations of Burrows and Hayes [41]. The curves plot the gravitational wave amplitude of the source as a function of time. (Figure 3 of [41]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 12:
The gravitational waveform for matter contributions from the asymmetric collapse simulations of Fryer et al. [87]. The curves plot the the gravitational wave amplitude of the source as a function of time. (Figure 3 of [87]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 13:
The gravitational waveform for neutrino contributions from the asymmetric collapse simulations of Fryer et al. [87]. The curves plot the product of the gravitational wave amplitude to the source as a function of time. (Figure 8 of [87]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 14:
Convective instabilities inside the proto-neutron star in the 2D simulation of Müller and Janka [176]. The evolutions of the temperature (left panels) and logarithmic density (right panels) distributions are shown for the radial region 15 - 95 km. The upper and lower panels correspond to times 12 and 21 ms, respectively, after the start of the simulation. The temperature values range from 10 2.5 × 10 to 11 1.8× 10 K. The values of the logarithm of the density range from 10.5 to -3 13.3 g cm. The temperature and density both increase as the colors change from blue to green, yellow, and red. (Figure 7 of [176]; used with permission.)
View Image Figure 15:
Quadrupole amplitudes E2 A20 [cm] from convective instabilities in various models of [176]. The upper left panel is the amplitude from a 2D simulation of proto-neutron star convection. The other three panels are amplitudes from 2D simulations of hot bubble convection. The imposed neutrino flux in the hot bubble simulations increases from the top right model through the bottom right model. (Figure 18 of [176]; used with permission.)
Watch/download Movie Figure 16: (Movie)
Movie showing the isosurface of material with radial velocities of 1000 km s-1 for 3 different simulation resolutions. The isosurface outlines the outward moving convective bubbles. The open spaces mark the downflows. Note that the upwelling bubbles are large and have very similar size scales to the two-dimensional simulations.
Watch/download Movie Figure 17: (Movie)
Movie showing the oscillation of the proto-neutron star caused by acoustic instabilities in the convective region above the shock.
View Image Figure 18:
A comparison between the GW amplitude h(f) for various sources and the LISA noise curve. See the text for details regarding the computations of h. The SMS sources are assumed to be located at a luminosity distance of 50 Gpc. The bar-mode source is a dynamical bar-mode.
View Image Figure 19:
Meridional plane density contours from the SMS collapse simulation of Saijo, Baumgarte, Shapiro, and Shibata [208]. The contour lines denote densities r = rc × d(1-i/16), where rc is the central density. The frames are plotted at (t/t D, r c, d)=(a)(5.0628 × 10- 4, 8.254 × 10 -9, - 7 10), (b)(2.50259, -4 1.225 × 10, -5 10), (c)(2.05360, - 3 8.328 × 10, -7 5.585 × 10), (d)(2.50405, 3.425 × 10- 2, 1.357 × 10-7), respectively. Here t, tD, and M0 are the time, dynamical time (V~ ------- = R3e/M, where Re is the initial equatorial radius and M is the mass), and rest mass. (Figure 15 of [208]; used with permission.)