"Massive Gravity"
Claudia de Rham 
1 Introduction
2 Massive and Interacting Fields
2.1 Proca field
2.2 Spin-2 field
2.3 From linearized diffeomorphism to full diffeomorphism invariance
2.4 Non-linear Stückelberg decomposition
2.5 Boulware–Deser ghost
I Massive Gravity from Extra Dimensions
3 Higher-Dimensional Scenarios
4 The Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati Model
4.1 Gravity induced on a brane
4.2 Brane-bending mode
4.3 Phenomenology of DGP
4.4 Self-acceleration branch
4.5 Degravitation
5 Deconstruction
5.1 Formalism
5.2 Ghost-free massive gravity
5.3 Multi-gravity
5.4 Bi-gravity
5.5 Coupling to matter
5.6 No new kinetic interactions
II Ghost-free Massive Gravity
6 Massive, Bi- and Multi-Gravity Formulation: A Summary
7 Evading the BD Ghost in Massive Gravity
7.1 ADM formulation
7.2 Absence of ghost in the Stückelberg language
7.3 Absence of ghost in the vielbein formulation
7.4 Absence of ghosts in multi-gravity
8 Decoupling Limits
8.1 Scaling versus decoupling
8.2 Massive gravity as a decoupling limit of bi-gravity
8.3 Decoupling limit of massive gravity
8.4 Λ3-decoupling limit of bi-gravity
9 Extensions of Ghost-free Massive Gravity
9.1 Mass-varying
9.2 Quasi-dilaton
9.3 Partially massless
10 Massive Gravity Field Theory
10.1 Vainshtein mechanism
10.2 Validity of the EFT
10.3 Non-renormalization
10.4 Quantum corrections beyond the decoupling limit
10.5 Strong coupling scale vs cutoff
10.6 Superluminalities and (a)causality
10.7 Galileon duality
III Phenomenological Aspects of Ghost-free Massive Gravity
11 Phenomenology
11.1 Gravitational waves
11.2 Solar system
11.3 Lensing
11.4 Pulsars
11.5 Black holes
12 Cosmology
12.1 Cosmology in the decoupling limit
12.2 FLRW solutions in the full theory
12.3 Inhomogenous/anisotropic cosmological solutions
12.4 Massive gravity on FLRW and bi-gravity
12.5 Other proposals for cosmological solutions
IV Other Theories of Massive Gravity
13 New Massive Gravity
13.1 Formulation
13.2 Absence of Boulware–Deser ghost
13.3 Decoupling limit of new massive gravity
13.4 Connection with bi-gravity
13.5 3D massive gravity extensions
13.6 Other 3D theories
13.7 Black holes and other exact solutions
13.8 New massive gravity holography
13.9 Zwei-dreibein gravity
14 Lorentz-Violating Massive Gravity
14.1 SO(3)-invariant mass terms
14.2 Phase m1 = 0
14.3 General massive gravity (m0 = 0)
15 Non-local massive gravity
16 Outlook

16 Outlook

The past decade has witnessed a revival of interest in massive gravity as a potential alternative to GR. The original theoretical obstacles that came in the way of deriving a consistent theory of massive gravity have now been overcome, but with them comes a new set of challenges that will be decisive in establishing the viability of such theories. The presence of a low strong coupling scale on which the Vainshtein mechanism relies has opened the door to a new way of thinking about these types of effective field theories. At the moment, it is yet unclear whether these types of theories could lead to an alternative to UV completion. The superluminalities that also arise in many cases with the Vainshtein mechanism should also be understood in more depth. At the moment, its real implications are not well understood and no case of true acausality has been shown to be present within the regime of validity of the theory. Finally, the difficulty in finding fully-fledged cosmological and black-hole solutions in many of these theories (both in ghost-free massive gravity and bi-gravity, and in other extensions or related models such as cascading gravity) makes their full phenomenology still evasive. Nevertheless, the well understood decoupling limits of these models can be used to say a great deal about phenomenology without going into the complications of the full theories. These represent many open questions in massive gravity, which reflect the fact that the field is yet extremely young and many developments are still in progress.
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