1.2 Overview of the numerical 1 Introduction1 Introduction

1.1 Current fields of research 

Relativity is a necessary ingredient for describing astrophysical phenomena involving compact objects. Among these phenomena are core collapse supernovae, X-ray binaries, pulsars, coalescing neutron stars, black hole formations, micro-quasars, active galactic nuclei, superluminal jets and gamma-ray bursts. When strong gravitational fields are encountered as, for example, in the case of coalescing neutron stars or near black holes, general relativistic effects must be considered. Also the significant gravitational wave signal produced by some of these phenomena can only be understood in the framework of the general theory of relativity. There are, however, astrophysical phenomena which involve flows at relativistic speeds but no strong gravitational fields, and thus at least certain aspects of these phenomena can be described within the framework of special relativity alone, disregarding general relativistic effects.

Another field of research, where special relativistic ``flows'' are encountered, are present-day heavy-ion collision experiments taking place in large particle accelerators. The heavy ions are accelerated to ultra-relativistic velocities very close to the speed of light (tex2html_wrap_inline5671  [166Jump To The Next Citation Point In The Article]) to study the equation of state for hot dense nuclear matter.



1.2 Overview of the numerical 1 Introduction1 Introduction

image Numerical Hydrodynamics in Special Relativity
Jose Maria Martí and Ewald Müller
http://www.livingreviews.org/lrr-1999-3
© Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. ISSN 1433-8351
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