6.1 Does a pure quantum state evolve to a mixed state in the process of black hole formation and evaporation?

In classical general relativity, the matter responsible for the formation of a black hole propagates into a singularity lying within the deep interior of the black hole. Suppose that the matter which forms a black hole possesses quantum correlations with matter that remains far outside of the black hole. Then it is hard to imagine how these correlations could be restored during the process of black hole evaporation unless gross violations of causality occur. In fact, the semiclassical analyses of the Hawking process show that, on the contrary, correlations between the exterior and interior of the black hole are continually built up as it evaporates (see [101Jump To The Next Citation Point] for further discussion). Indeed, these correlations play an essential role in giving the Hawking radiation an exactly thermal character [98].

As already mentioned in Section 4.1 above, an isolated black hole will “evaporate” completely via the Hawking process within a finite time. If the correlations between the inside and outside of the black hole are not restored during the evaporation process, then by the time that the black hole has evaporated completely, an initial pure state will have evolved to a mixed state, i.e., “information” will have been lost. In a semiclassical analysis of the evaporation process, such information loss does occur and is ascribable to the propagation of the quantum correlations into the singularity within the black hole. A key unresolved issue in black hole thermodynamics is whether this conclusion continues to hold in a complete quantum theory of gravity. On one hand, arguments can be given [101Jump To The Next Citation Point] that alternatives to information loss – such as the formation of a high entropy “remnant” or the gradual restoration of correlations during the late stages of the evaporation process – seem highly implausible. On the other hand, it is commonly asserted that the evolution of an initial pure state to a final mixed state is in conflict with quantum mechanics. For this reason, the issue of whether a pure state can evolve to a mixed state in the process of black hole formation and evaporation is usually referred to as the “black hole information paradox”.

There appear to be two logically independent grounds for the claim that the evolution of an initial pure state to a final mixed state is in conflict with quantum mechanics:

  1. Such evolution is asserted to be incompatible with the fundamental principles of quantum theory, which postulates a unitary time evolution of a state vector in a Hilbert space.
  2. Such evolution necessarily gives rise to violations of causality and/or energy-momentum conservation and, if it occurred in the black hole formation and evaporation process, there would be large violations of causality and/or energy-momentum (via processes involving “virtual black holes”) in ordinary laboratory physics.

With regard to (1), within the semiclassical framework, the evolution of an initial pure state to a final mixed state in the process of black hole formation and evaporation can be attributed to the fact that the final time slice fails to be a Cauchy surface for the spacetime [101Jump To The Next Citation Point]. No violation of any of the local laws of quantum field theory occurs. In fact, a closely analogous evolution of an initial pure state to a final mixed state occurs for a free, massless field in Minkowski spacetime if one chooses the final “time” to be a hyperboloid rather than a hyperplane [101Jump To The Next Citation Point]. (Here, the “information loss” occurring during the time evolution results from radiation to infinity rather than into a black hole.) Indeed, the evolution of an initial pure state to a final mixed state is naturally accommodated within the framework of the algebraic approach to quantum theory [101] as well as in the framework of generalized quantum theory [51].

The main arguments for (2) were given in [11] (see also [42]). However, these arguments assume that the effective evolution law governing laboratory physics has a “Markovian” character, so that it is purely local in time. As pointed out in [96Jump To The Next Citation Point], one would expect a black hole to retain a “memory” (stored in its external gravitational field) of its energy-momentum, so it is far from clear that an effective evolution law modeling the process of black hole formation and evaporation should be Markovian in nature. Furthermore, even within the Markovian context, it is not difficult to construct models where rapid information loss occurs at the Planck scale, but negligible deviations from ordinary dynamics occur at laboratory scales [96].

For the above reasons, I do not feel that the issue of whether a pure state evolves to a mixed state in the process of black hole formation and evaporation should be referred to as a “paradox”. Nevertheless, the resolution of this issue is of great importance: If pure states remain pure, then our basic understanding of black holes in classical and semiclassical gravity will have to undergo significant revision in quantum gravity. On the other hand, if pure states evolve to mixed states in a fully quantum treatment of the gravitational field, then at least the aspect of the classical singularity as a place where “information can get lost” must continue to remain present in quantum gravity. In that case, rather than “smooth out” the singularities of classical general relativity, one might expect singularities to play a fundamental role in the formulation of quantum gravity [76]. Thus, the resolution of this issue would tell us a great deal about both the nature of black holes and the existence of singularities in quantum gravity.


  Go to previous page Go up Go to next page