List of Figures

View Image Figure 1:
Function f = cos3(πx ∕2) + (x + 1)3 ∕8 (black curve) and its best approximation of degree 2 (red curve). The blue arrows denote the four points where the maximum error is attained.
View Image Figure 2:
Lagrange cardinal polynomials ℓX 3 (red curve) and ℓX 7 on an uniform grid with N = 8. The black circles denote the nodes of the grid.
View Image Figure 3:
Function f = cos3(πx ∕2) + (x + 1)3 ∕8 (black curve) and its interpolant (red curve)on a uniform grid of five nodes. The blue circles show the position of the nodes.
View Image Figure 4:
Function ----1---- f = 1 + 16x2 (black curve) and its interpolant (red curve) on a uniform grid of five nodes (left panel) and 14 nodes (right panel). The blue circles show the position of the nodes.
View Image Figure 5:
Same as Figure 4 but using a grid based on the zeros of Chebyshev polynomials. The Runge phenomenon is no longer present.
View Image Figure 6:
Function f = cos3(πx ∕2) + (x + 1 )3 ∕8 (black curve) and its projection on Chebyshev polynomials (red curve), for N = 4 (left panel) and N = 8 (right panel).
View Image Figure 7:
Function f = cos3(πx ∕2) + (x + 1)3∕8 (black curve) and its interpolant IN f on Chebyshev polynomials (red curve), for N = 4 (left panel) and N = 6 (right panel). The collocation points are denoted by the blue circles and correspond to Gauss–Lobatto quadrature.
View Image Figure 8:
First Legendre polynomials, from P 0 to P 5.
View Image Figure 9:
First Chebyshev polynomials, from T 0 to T 5.
View Image Figure 10:
Maximum difference between f = cos3 (πx∕2) + (x + 1)3∕8 and its interpolant I f N, as a function of N.
View Image Figure 11:
Step function (black curve) and its interpolant, for various values of N.
View Image Figure 12:
Exact solution (64View Equation) of Equation (62View Equation) (blue curve) and the numerical solution (red curve) computed by means of a tau method, for N = 4 (left panel) and N = 8 (right panel).
View Image Figure 13:
Exact solution (64View Equation) of Equation (62View Equation) (blue curve) and the numerical solution (red curve) computed by means of a collocation method, for N = 4 (left panel) and N = 8 (right panel).
View Image Figure 14:
Exact solution (64View Equation) of Equation (62View Equation) (blue curve) and the numerical solution (red curve) computed by means of the Galerkin method, for N = 4 (left panel) and N = 8 (right panel).
View Image Figure 15:
The difference between the exact solution (64View Equation) of Equation (62View Equation) and its interpolant (black curve) and between the exact and numerical solutions for i) the tau method (green curve and circle symbols) ii) the collocation method (blue curve and square symbols) iii) the Galerkin method (red curve and triangle symbols).
View Image Figure 16:
Difference between the exact and numerical solutions of the following test problem. 2 d-u-+ 4u = S dx2, with S (x < 0 ) = 1 and S (x > 0) = 0. The boundary conditions are u (x = − 1) = 0 and u (x = 1) = 0. The black curve and circles denote results from the multidomain tau method, the red curve and squares from the method based on the homogeneous solutions, the blue curve and diamonds from the variational one, and the green curve and triangles from the collocation method.
View Image Figure 17:
Regular deformation of the [− 1,1] × [− 1,1] square.
View Image Figure 18:
Two sets of spherical domains describing a neutron star or black hole binary system. Each set is surrounded by a compactified domain of the type (89View Equation), which is not displayed
View Image Figure 19:
Definition of spherical coordinates (r,𝜃,φ) of a point M and associated triad (⃗e ,⃗e ,⃗e ) r 𝜃 φ, with respect to the Cartesian ones.
View Image Figure 20:
Regions of absolute stability for the Adams–Bashforth integration schemes of order one to four.
View Image Figure 21:
Regions of absolute stability for the Runge–Kutta integration schemes of order two to five. Note that the size of the region increases with order.
View Image Figure 22:
Eigenvalues of the first derivative-tau operator (124View Equation) for Chebyshev polynomials. The largest (in modulus) eigenvalue is not displayed; this one is real, negative and goes as O(N 2).
View Image Figure 23:
Behavior of the error in the solution of the differential equation (135View Equation), as a function of the parameter τ entering the numerical scheme (136View Equation).